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  • Posts by Michelle S. Jones
    Associate Counsel

    Michelle’s practice is focused on indigenous law and environmental law. She also advises clients (primarily employers) on occupational health and safety matters. Michelle’s practice primarily involves administrative and ...

As described in our recent previous blog posts[1], on February 8, 2018 the federal government introduced Bill C-69, An Act to enact the Impact Assessment Act and the Canadian Energy Regulator Act, to amend the Navigation Protection Act and to make consequential amendments to other Acts. Bill C-69 overhauls the federal environmental assessment process for major projects.

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This is the most recent blog in a series of posts which discuss the proposed recommendations set out by the Expert Panel in its report entitled Building Common Ground – A New Vision for Impact Assessment in Canada, The Final Report of the Expert Panel for the Review of the Environmental Assessment Processes (the "Report"), released April 5, 2017. This entry will focus on the ...

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On April 15, 2015, the BC Court of Appeal issued its decision in Saik’uz First Nation and Stellat’en First Nation v. Rio Tinto Alcan Inc, 2015 BCCA 154. The decision is significant because the Court of Appeal found that proof of an existing Aboriginal right (including title) is not required prior to Aboriginal peoples commencing claims against private parties to enforce ...

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On December 27th, 2012, the Court of Appeal for Yukon released its decision in Ross River Dena Council v. Government of Yukon, 2012 YKCA 14.  The case dealt with the Yukon Government’s duty to consult with First Nations when allowing mineral claims to be recorded on land with asserted Aboriginal rights and title claims. The case arose as a result of the “open entry” claim ...

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On January 8, 2013, the  Federal Court released its decision in Daniels v Canada, 2013 FC 6, a case involving the scope of the word “Indian” under section 91(24) of the Constitution Act, 1867.  The plaintiffs sought a declaration that Métis and non-status Indians (“MNSI”) are “Indians” for the purposes of section 91(24) of the Constitution Act, 1867.

The Court ...

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On October 26, 2012, the Joint Review Panel (the “Panel”) established to review the Jackpine Mine Expansion Project (the “Jackpine Project”) found that its statutory jurisdiction does not include the authority to adjudicate the adequacy of the Crown’s consultation with First Nations. As interested parties in the proceeding, the Athabasca Chipewyan First ...

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The Alberta Court of Appeal has denied the Cold Lake First Nations’ (CLFN) application to appeal a decision by Alberta’s Energy Resources Conservation Board (ERCB) that it did not have the jurisdiction to determine the adequacy of Crown consultation in respect of a bitumen recovery project within the CLFN’s treaty territory. The ERCB held that although it has the ...

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Posted in Indigenous Law

September 2012 marked the 20th anniversary of the creation of the BC Treaty Commission and on October 10, 2012, the BC Treaty Commission released its annual report titled “Learning from our Success”. The report includes a reflection of the successes and challenges the BC Treaty Commission has seen over the past 20 years. Since 1992, the BC Treaty Commission has seen two ...

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On September 25, 2012, the BC Court of Appeal released its reasons in Neskonlith Indian Band v Salmon Arm (City), 2012 BCCA 379 dismissing an appeal by the Neskonlith Indian Band (the “Neskonlith”) seeking, inter alia, a declaration that the City of Salmon Arm (the “City”) had a duty to consult with the Neskonlith. The case involved a judicial review brought by the ...

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On August 9, 2012, the BC Court of Appeal released its decision in Adams Lake Indian Band v. Lieutenant Governor in Council, 2012 BCCA 333 in which it reversed the BC Supreme Court’s finding that consultation by the Province with the Adams Lake Indian Band in respect of the incorporation of Sun Peaks Mountain Resort as a municipality was inadequate. On appeal, the Province ...

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Lawson Lundell's Project Law Blog focuses on updating proponents on issues emerging in the law and policy that applies to the development of major projects in Canada. The focus of the blog is on matters relating to environmental assessment and compliance, regulatory matters and Indigenous consultation.

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